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of the entirety of american history. one looked at the union government, the structure of the states and the federal government in the union in the state's and the federal the limit in the confederacy and says the confederacy was the state. they succeeded on state rights and then they had to build and proceeded to because they had to build this enormous state apparatus. they conscripted within a year. think about that as a statement of state power. they conscripted within a year and they passed the taxes within basically a year, and they had agents of the federal government all over the south literally taking food out of people's barnes. it was the only way that they could feed the army. so, fay and pressed which was an enormous fight, that is the fascinating part of the story is these huge slaveholders go to war to protect and then they find out the new government is there to protect them in the war but it turns out the federal government wants to and needs to use them to win the war. it is this the enormous cost of between the slave holders and the government and they also read equ
of slavery? well, last week the federal government as it does, you know, once or twice a year came out with its latest figures on birthrights. and in particular on one i'm going to point to is the illegitimacy rate or out-of-wedlock births. here they are. 72.3% of african-americans now are born out of wedlock. 72.3%. american indians, 66.2%. latinos, it's 53.3%. for whites it's still pretty high, but it's 29.1 percent. and for asians it's 17.2%. so in other words, seven out of ten, six out of ten, five out of ten for blacks, american end yangs and latinos. these are the so-called underrepresented minorities that get racial preferences. and then fewer than three out of ten and fewer than two out of ten for whites and aiz items -- asians, people who are typically discriminated against. it is no accident that these figures line up quite well with how well different groups are doing not only in terms of education, but in terms of crime and, you know, whatever social indicator you want. that is the real problem. and, of course, that is not going to be fixed by racial preferences and univers
. the washington post reports the yemeni government tried to hide u.s. responsibility for the attack by taking credit for carrying it out. the yemeni government also initially claimed only militants were killed in the strike, or forced to withdraw that claim after mourners tried to bring the dead bodies to the gates of the presidential residence. according to the washington post, the attack has devastated the community and militants in surrounding areas have gained more recruits for their fight against the u.s.-backed yemeni government since it occurred. diplomatic cables released by wikileaks in 2010 show the u.s. and yemen have repeatedly covered up the use of u.s. warplanes to bomb yemen. according to the bureau of investigative journalism, covert u.s. operations have killed up to 171 civilians there including 35 children over the past decade. a top syrian general responsible for preventing military defections has defected himself to syria's opposition brigit major-general abdul al-shallal, the head of syria's military police, crossed into neighboring turkey and a daring break with the regi
acts and other, government properties and government records so people can follow. >> yes, two house committees controlled by the republicans are now investigating the richard windsor issue. i hope they will ask that question. how widespread is this illegal practice? who else has been doing it? let's see those records. there needs to be a wide spread investigation here. and i hope that the republican controlled house of representatives will do a good job of it. tom: i don't even know how do you, that they are not looking around at outside e-mails this is almost a paula brad broadwell, getting someone else involved. finding out where are the e-mails. >> i think it is clear the obama administration, and remember president obama promised his would be the most transparent transparent administration is mystery, we will need cabinet secretaries and other high obama appointees before a commity and swear them, take their testimony under oath where they have used the secret e-mail acouncil account to evad. tom: talking about fact maybe now that president will include west virginia in the co
. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really does three from 1964 to two dozen eight could be thought of as kind of the carried of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year perio
of the confederation, that government is too weak so we are starting to write the constitution. this is where the second amendment obviously comes. how did this all develop? >> guest: nowadays it's become fashionable among the people that support them rights strongly to pick out this or that quotation from that leader like samuel adams or thomas jefferson or whoever and implied that in the second amendment is basically seen as a rate of the individuals to defend themselves and defend themselves against the government when it became tyrannical. that is a misunderstanding. it was a political matter in the second amendment. it was a part of what became the bill of rights, and the reason for it is that when -- after the unhappy experience of the articles of the confederation led the founders to try to figure out a better way of governing this country, they came up with a constitution that is full of checks and balances, but as it was submitted to the states for the ratification it became clear that they might not get the nine states they needed unless there were promises of still more controls ov
with the gold standard. now, what could the greek government have done? two greek prime ministers. one from 2004 to 2009. in greece, greece has had experience with that since 1974 after the expiration of parliamentary democracy. government, regardless of which party is in government, the accelerator to create some kind of flimsy growth, at some point it became clear that we had a cliff. our debt situation would get too much. and then we would hit the brakes. austerity. which creates increased unemployment. but nevertheless, the debt was manageable. they did this up until 2004. 2004 was accelerated because of the olympics. the next government should have stopped it. but unfortunately government is government. government kept the foot firmly on the accelerator. why? because german capital was flowing to the country at cheap rates, financing ponzi schemes. it is just like the subprime market here where people were coerced to take loans that could not afford. similarly in greece. so, you had executives coming to greece, bribing politicians. the greek government -- they did not listen. then 2008. the
basically raise money to cover eight days of government spending, but you know, david and adam, we've had the letter from nancy pelosi. do you really believe it was a ploy to smoke out the republicans? because nancy pelosi in her letter is equating millionaires to big oil, special interest and corporations. why doesn't the g.o.p. capitalize on that they really want middle class tax hikes when they're talking about raising taxes on the 250,000 plus crowd >> well, i think speaker boehner and the republicans in the house would be able to get some democrats support for the millionaire tax increase which i don't think they did enough of and they had to call off that vote as we all know on that plan. but some democrats would support something like that, but we're talking here about the leadership speaker-- minority leader pelosi and you know, she, because now it's republicans proposing it, now they seem to be backing away. they might be able to get some conservative leaning or moderate democrats to support something like that. and the president, as we know, the white house has signaled they wou
of their recruiting. >> they realize this but it would be hard for any government agent to say i'm going to support a buy polar agent who is sleeping with an as lamb i can radical. >> in some ways it highlights those things more in terms of one person. through the whole journey of frost nixon, his relationship which garn in a small theater in london, then broadway, then a movie. the very first preview performance of frost nixon in a theater in london, the entire back row was lawyers, the third preview david there was having been given the all clear or told you should go see it yourself and he was shaken by it to begin w. for a man who is incredibly generous and warm and positive and supportive of everything, i think he felt very confused by how he should react to this. and as the whole thing went on as it started to become clear this was going to be a massive hit in terms of the play and the theater version of it, he started to get behind it because he's a very good business man and he started to go, well, okay, there is a certain amount of this i don't believe actually happened and is not true and
a social security, medicare, medicaid. that is not the only entitlements. every government program that has a retirement benefit, a health-care benefit, those are entitlements, two, up to and including the entitlements for the congressman. let's be fair. when they start talking about entitlements and hold it to those three items, let's hold their feet to the fire and make them talk about entitlements for the other folks, too. host: appreciate you calling this morning. donna writes about this on twitter. if that to facebook here. -- back to you facebook here. budget showdown hits the keep week. that is of the front page reminding us of the deadline looming. it is a bloomberg story here out of the district. i you can watch the byplay here on the c-span that works with the president heading back to town tonight. the senate and house are due back tomorrow. billy from jacksonville, florida, to life for waiting. caller: i am very optimistic but i worry that the president will not get a chance because lindsey gramm already stated he will fight. i think there will already be another big fight for t
originally called in response to set oralism in government, which i prefer -- secularism in government, which are for. a country which invites everyone into it, all religions and nationalities, must by definition be secular. any religious direction we choose is going to favor somebody, and i thought that is what we were trying to avoid. at least i thought that is what jefferson meant when he talked about religious freedoms. host: ok. caller: freedom from religion. host: when you go to vote in a presidential election or congressional election, what are the big factors in your decision? caller: usually economic. i did not consider -- i don't consider religion unless it interferes with some legislation. it plays a very little role in my life. host: would you call yourself unaffiliated religiously? caller: relatively i am an atheist. so, yes, i am unaffiliated. host: here is the "christian science monitor," their cover. the new face of faith. what is happening in new england, the countries most secular region, may have a future of american religion. traditional religions are seeing their ranks th
wrong, did not mislead, did not misrepresent, i dithe best with information united states government had at thete time. >lou: here's what ambassador rie did say five days after onl benghazi. >> the best information we have today is this was not a pre-planned, premeditated attack.th what happened initially was a spontaneous action to what had just transpired in cairo as a consequence of the video. lou: she said nobody is blameless. joining us now, fox news middlen east analyst. it is great to have you with us. your reaction first to her claim she did not misrepresent, did not lie about what happened in benghazi. >> she may be mistaking the version of national security given to her is well defined in the sense she said what she had to say, she did not commit a lie with the american public knowing it did, but on the other handinw there was an assessment made in washington prior to that the next few hours clearly this was a terrorist attack by armed people. in between those two there's a political decision not to tell the truth as to what happened for political reasons. that is something the
of these talks, whether it was about government shutdown in the spring of 2011 or the debt limit debate in the summer of 2011 or the payroll tax-cut debate last year, those negotiations started at a level between the president and speaker but always broke down at that level and that pushed to the senate where harry reid and mitch mcconnell had to figure something out and get enough votes for it so they could give some cover to the house republicans, who were joined by a large majority of house democrats to get something done. the idea that we have come to this state is not necessarily surprising. that it has taken us so long to get there has probably frustrated everyone who wanted to take a holiday break. if mitch mcconnell wants to play ball, and i think there's a role for him to do so. when you speak with aids from his office, they say we will get involved, but we would like to see some good faith offer from the majority leader. aides from his office. right now that process has not happened. as for for action today in the senate, it's not going to be anything where they reached the fi
a country, we have the articles of confederation, and that government's two weeks, writing the constitution. this is where the second amendment obviously comes in. how did that all development? what's the -- >> guest: well, nowadays it's become fashionable among people who support gun rights strongly to pick out this or that quotation from this or that leader like samuel adams, thomas jefferson, or whoever and apply the second amendment was seen as a way to enable individuals to defend themselves and defend themselves against the government when it was tie tyrannical. that's a mismonsing. it was a political matter, the second amount. it was part of what became the bill of rights, and the reason for it is that when -- after the unhappy experience of the articles of confederation that led the founders to try to figure out a better way to govern the country, they came up with the constitution which we know is full of checks and balances, but as it was submitted to the states for ratification, it became clear that they might not get the nine states needed unless there were promises of still mor
. let me start with this. i have a message for the tea party members everywhere, destroying government is not good politics. you are engaged in negative politics. you are acting against the majority rule right now. you are trying to bring down the majority government by obstruction. people will remember. whot won tax relief. people who believe in government will remember. the people who believe in national defense and social security and medicare will remember. they will know which party is trying to destroy working democracy in order to pursue its political ends. they will know who listens to the voter, who respects the voter, and who thumbs his nose at the voter and that ladies and gentlemen of the tea party right is you. we go over this cliff and you will not have to ask for whom the bell tolls, it willing tolling for you. leading off tonight josh green and chris frats of national journal. you don't have to be as clear as i, but try, gentlemen, tonight. it looks to me like one party, guns again it's asymmetric. both parties are not screwing around, one is. is that true? >> i think b
bit of fear into these people. it just shows the control the wealthy have over the government in both parties. host: more from "the washington post." they write -- back to the telephones. derrick from maryland on the line for democrats. your thoughts about the fiscal clause bill. caller: i think they will do a good deal if they can keep mitch mcconnell out of there. one of the things i really have a problem with, that is when thing i say democrats, let's get the ground game for 2014. republicansd of the at enter the house. let's take the house and just ran it all down their throats. host: we will move onto glen on the line for independents. caller: here is the problem that we have a. we have people that are working hard for the american people. we have a constitution. we have deviated from the constitution. host: who are the people working hard for the american people? caller: the american citizens. it takes two american citizens -- your mother and father have to be american citizens to be the president of the united states. we need to have a confirmation hearing. on the birth certifi
. this morning they approve and extension of the farm intelligence v it allows the government to continue intercepting overseas communication. it extends legal immunity phone companies that help the government wiretap the domestic phone calls. president obama plans to sign the bill. when the senate is back we are expecting senators to continued work on the $60 billion hurricane sandy relief package. negotiations continue on avoiding the so-called fiscal cliff. both parties head to the white house today to discuss the fiscal cliff with the president. it's at 3:00 p.m. eastern in the oval office. senate in recess until 2:00 p.m. eastern when the senate reconveneses, live coverage here on c-span2. >>> and right now on c-span2 a conversation with nebraska senator ben nelson who is retiring after two terms. >>> retiring senator nebraska ben tell me sop. years that began with the 2003 recount and reended with re-election of president obama. if you could think of the adjective to describe these years what would it be? >> clearly interesting. challenging. sometimes totally frustrating. but also f
be slashed by 464 billion. 1,000 government programs face potential cuts, including three that directly impact air travel. john bentley has the story. >> reporter: long waits at airport security are nothing new. but if the u.s. government goes over the fiscal cliff, they could get even longer. according to one congressional analysis, the transportation security administration would lose more than $640 million in funding, roughly 7% of out budget. t.s.a. with would also lose over 7,000 security officers. safety would not be compromised. the passenger misery would increase. >> it could be a severe impact on the traveling public. instead of maybe one hour, you may be there two or three hours before. >> reporter: long lines would be the least of the problems. under the mandatory cuts of the fiscal cliff, the federal aviation administration would lose $800 million, and more than 2,000 air traffic controllers. fewer controllers mean fewer planes moving passengers and cargo. warns the air traffic controllers association. >> fb's pocketbook and livelihood is tied to the aviation system, so the
geithner. it could delay the tax filings. the government relies on august revenue to come in and it usually comes flooding in during march and april. people need to pay their taxes, but they don't know which tax rules will apply. host: the other deadline is the debt limit. here at $16.4 trillion. guest: >> the treasury department can stop funding federal pensions and do some other maneuvers, essentially to buy them another six weeks of time. we all at this last year. closer they get to that is when financial markets will start going crazy. the debates we are having now about tax and spending will likely be the same debates we are having six weeks from now. host: there's the u.s. debt clock. you can also see how much that is for individuals and what protection is moving ahead. our guest is damian paletta of the wall street journal. the covers finances and congress and the white house. his work is available online. from the senate floor yesterday, these comments by the senate democratic leader harry reid. [video clip] >> the speakership all members of the house back to washington today. he sh
the federal government cannot let it be known. but they came out with the most recent figures great 72.5% of african americans now are born out of wedlock. 72.3%. american indians, 66.2%. latinos, 53.3%. white people, still pretty high, 29.1%. for asian people, it is 17.2%. so in other words, seven out of 10, six out of 10, five out of 10 for blacks and american indians and latinos because they are the so-called underrepresented in minority who get racial preferences. and a two out of 10 people are typically have racial problems. not only in terms of education but in terms of crime and whatever social indicators that you want. now, that is the real problem. of course, that is not going to be fixed by racial preferences. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, roger. now we will hear from alan morrison, who is the lerner family associate dean for public interest and public service law at the george washington university school of law. he is responsible for creating pro bono opportunities for students, bringing a wide range of public interest programs to the law school, encouraging students
with the government's first position on guantanamo bay was no-man's land they already rented from cuba the majority was to the extent that the law exists in guantanamo bay. there is no other power, certainly castro is not controlling what was happening there. so, to the government said habeas corpus doesn't extend to guantanamo bay so for that purpose of this part of the usa and a follow on cases in in the lower court so all of the returns are in. >> the next question is 1i know you never get. what is your view of the nomination process that comes from fort lewis and how might it be improved to make it less frustrating were demeaning to? >> it wasn't always the way it has been for the nominations. it would include our chief justice, justice alito, justice so why -- sotomayor and justice kagan. people decided to go along party lines. contrast that with the way that it was when i was nominated in 1993 in the justice breyer the following year. my biggest supporter of the senate judiciary committee was senator orrin hatch and he confirmed that and he wrote an autobiography in which he takes great pride
and there will also be spending cuts to government programs as well as the military and that will be spread over with 2013 and the world doesn't come to an end if we go over this quote, unquote, fiscal cliff and instead, a lot of the damage gets spread out and congress does have the power to go back and fix things. >> is it more important that the payroll tax holiday will go away and that is another thing that will end up happening. >> the payroll tax holiday will be a temporary sting, and it was crafted in 2010 and that is right in the waning days of the 111th congress when they still held in control the house of representatives and all of the counter proposals and counter proposals, and house speaker john boehner and the offers we have on the table don't deal with the payroll tax holiday and they go up to people on the amount of money they put in the social security trust fund and that is your payroll tax and those will go up and pretty much regardless if we get a deal or we don't. >> mark murray from d.c., breaking it down for us and the senior editor, thank you, sir. >> as lawmakers in d.c.
to ezzpows like the assault rivals. the government dyeds what -- decides what type of firearm every person in the united states of america is allowed to own or not allowed to own, that is the start of the loss of the second amendment, and that will be the disarming of the united states of america. host: kenneth, you talked about the liberals. but in this article, the "new york daily news" this morning, they quote several republicans, among them, senator tom coburn, also objected to lapierre's plan, sort of. he said -- host: what are your thoughts to those responses from those republicans? caller: i agree with those comments. let me say this, as far as the more broad sense of this issue with regards to the connecticut shootings. it's perfectly clear that the young man that committed that atrocity was troubled individual. the problem with our society is that we need something to recognize, deal with, and stride help with, for the people, the families, the parents that have to do that. i've read a number of articles since then where by sthradse have that mental illness, but when they go to se
. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: s. 3709, a bill to require a government accoun accountability office examination of transactions between large financial institutions and the federal government and for other purposes. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection. mr. reid: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that the vitter-brown of ohio amendment, which is at the desk, be agreed to, and the bill add amende as e read a third time and passed, motions to reconsider be laid on the table, that all statements related to the bill be placed in the record at the appropriate place as if read. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the foreign relations committee be discharged from further consideration of s. res. 613 and we proceed to that matter now. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: s. res. 613, urging the governments of europe and the european union to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization and so forth. the presiding officer: is there objection to proce
that the government can regulate things we agree as a society we don't want and we do that with cigarettes, we do that with alcohol and should do it with other drugs. >> paul: thanks, mary. if you have your own hit or miss, please send it to us at ger@foxnews.com and follow us on twitter@gerfnc. thanks to my fan and all of you watching, i'm paul gigot and hope to you right here next week. >> on fox news watch. >> i'm sorry, mr. ambassador, but your statement that the president and ambassador-- and secretary clinton made clear that it was a terrorist attack right afterwards is not true. it's not accurate. >> jon: following the release of the benghazi report which slams the state department for failures at high levels, congressional hearings get underway to unravel the murky details surrounding the deadly terror attack on our consulate. >> i want to first start by apologizing to the deputy-secretaries because you have been brought here as an ruse. >> jon: but the probe turned into a political face-off. some ignored the issues. are the media following their lead? >> shortly after 9:30 this morning,
government and weak union forces. coln's "n drehle on linkedin rise to greatness." this weekend on c-span 2. >> "tubes" author andrew blum joined just on "the communicators." >> i tried to make our virtual world as tangible as possible. i found out one of the major maps of the internet i was looking at, it was called tele geography. it was made in milwaukee. they watch this thing come off a giant schoolbus machine. it seem like a great way into the store of figuring out not only were the internet is, but also trying to come to terms with what is still physical about our virtual world. it turned out that one thing that is physical are the very large printing presses and large printing presses that rent ma pt maps of the internet. i followed a mapmaker there to see this map of the internet come off of the press. >> is there a center of the universe when it comes to the internet? >> there is. there is not just one center, but a dozen buildings around the world that are by far -- they are the places where nmore the works of the internet and it more than anywhere else. new york, london, tokyo. t
an armed guard at columbine. now, rather than creating new laws, the nra says the federal government needs to do a better job enforcing the ones already on the books. >> thank you, tara mergener, in washington. >>> now, there's one week till the fiscal deadline. the president and congress are on holiday break. the last best hope for a deal may rest in the senate. yesterday senator lindsey graham said he would vote for a revenue increase including a tax hike, but doesn't like it. >> hikes are part of the solution driven by the president but he's going to get tax rate hikes. to my republican colleagues, if we can prevent 99% of the americans from a tax hike, that's not an increase in my book. >> households between 50 and $75,000 will see a an increase of $2,399. meanwhile households of. >>> overseas an attack on americans in afghanistan. police officer police officers, over 50 have been killed by police and soldiers this year. >>> a british-based group said over 60 people were killed. yesterday's air strike was an apparent retaliation for new rebel offensive. elizabeth palmer visited the to
capturing the political process, getting the government contracts and affecting outcomes we are also subject to that. and to see somebody say those things is a lot more than i say in my book but what you are saying is true in its deeply important. >> philip auerswald, you write about the current telecommunications revolution that we are all living and trying to understand and manage. helpless. >> so, first of all, we have to understand the difference between a mobile phone and a rich country and a mobile phone and most of the world. so, before the mobile phone only to technologies had spread as widely as the mobile phone. no technology has spread as rapidly as the mobile phone. the only other recent one was the transistor radio and before that, it was fired to spread as wildly. so, what is the -- we know what it means in our lives and what smart phones been and all that but what does it mean for the majority of the world's population. it was built highways, communication highways and labor never connected before. in afghanistan we talk about story that you asked about entrepreneurs and was r
relatives, nobody's safe in the city anymore. we don't really see the government picking up that as an issue. i mean safety is the first thing that you would assure to a citizen, right? >> reporter: this isn't the first time a rape case has been reported. but many more never are, but this case has become a lightning rod in india. dissolution with the government -- protesters say enough is enough. >> the brutality of this crime and the way it has been handled kind of insensitive treatment that some of the statements that some of the politicians and some of the people have made ensure that not only me -- i mean everybody has come out to see that this is not done and we are not okay with this. >> they want to see the government take concrete steps to address their concerns. >> surely, definitely. then you know, just faster justice systems. you need to have special courts when it's not open to the public. i think that's still a provision, but you need to have more courts and better hearing and stronger systems. >> reporter: it's no longer about one girl or one particular rape case. it's about in
and scope of government in a way responsible to the voters of that midterm election. instead what we're almost certain to see is an expansion of government in the name of reintroducing it. we're likely to see much bigger government long term. we're not likely to deal with entitlement reforms as we need to do. as you suggest the president is pushing some short-term spending increases often in washington turn into long-term spending increases. gregg: but, steve, bill kristol, conservative, you know what, time to throw in the towel. you do not want to get blamed for raising taxes on 98% of americans. >> right. gregg: right? >> look, bill kristol is my boss and editor at "the weekly standard" and one of most handsome and well-regarded editors in the country as everybody knows. look, i think he was making what was, in effect a practical case. there are people who are making this case behind the scenes. you have seen, he said, get it over with. move beyond this. there are others saying absolutely not. republicans can't cave on the principle of raising tacks. i think interesting thing in wh
there. we all know the budget constraints that all these governments are under. on the other side, the president of the national education association says we do not need guns in schools, period. >> well, they need protection. the kids need protection. bill clinton thought they needed protection. the israelis have tested it, and it works there. you know, what we've suggested that each school district and each school administrator look at the problem that they face. right now you have a mix. you have federally funded officers in many schools. you have a mix of funding in other schools sprup volunteers in some place where's administrators are armed with concealed carry and all that. we're not saying that it ought to be this or that, that one size fits all program will work. what we are saying is the first obligation that we have is to protect our children and the way do you that is you look at the problem. and know-- >> schieffer: don't you try to also try to get some of these guns off the streets, get some of these guns out of markets? every study shows that when a society-- the fe
this as a struggle for a better and safer society for women. >> reporter: the indian government is promising to respond, saying the young woman's death will not have been in vain. nbc news, london. >>> startling images out of russia tonight where a plane broke into pieces after sliding off a runway. the jet, belonging to the russian airline red wings, veered on to a snowy field and a highway after landing it broke apart, caught fire, killing at least four crew members and injuring four others. the plane had flown back from the czech republic and was not carrying any passengers. >>> back in this country, in arizona controversial sheriff joe arpaio is making headlines again tonight with a proposal to station armed posses outside public schools. arpaio says he wants to place the volunteers at 50 schools in the phoenix area within a week, although arizona law currently prohibits carrying guns on public school grounds. the idea follows of course the school shootings in newtown, connecticut and the nra's call to station armed officers at public schools. >>> and the first step toward a potential la
and a president who's tall, cool, cerebral, pretty good at politics but doesn't like to admit it having to govern in a frack white house atmosphere. there is something that seems familiar about that. [laughter] so i want to do two quick stories about jefferson to give you two sides of him very quickly. matthew davis, a office seeker from new york, goes to monticello trying to get an appointment. he was, would have fit right in this city even now. travels to lobby for the job. he was a burr loyalist. jefferson, not so much. one of the things i say to my hamill tone yang guys is at least my guy didn't get shot in jersey. [laughter] so, and of all the founders, the most likely to have sent shirtless e-mails is alexander hamilton. [laughter] want to get that on the record, and then we'll move on. matthew davis is sitting there pleading his case, and jefferson's looking sort of -- listening in that vaguely charming way he had. you could leave, and everyone who left his company thought he agrueled with them which was -- agreed with them which was a wonderful way to get through the moment, not such a ag
and the republicans in future negotiations. and raised a question of whether anyone can get a governing majority in the house of representatives when it comes to the budget. those are really serious matters. now it does go to the senate where harry reid and mcconnell can try to come to some, you know, functional su render for republicans and kick the cannon a lot of other issues and see if that can pass in the next ten days am buts that still has to pass the house. and so i think the chances of backing off of the cliff are higher than they ever have been. >> you know, i listened to some of these recalcitrant house republicans today, mark. and they were saying, i was to the going to vote for a tax increase when my constituent was never have gone along with that. >> well, i think there are two realities, here, judy. first of all there's a lot of republicans, more than a few democrats who are terrified of one thing, that's being primary, primary opponent without going to run on your right if you are a republican. on your left if you are a democrat. it's really become a problem for republicans. beca
the government to do nothing about spending? are you happy with obamacare? most would say no, but in the end the choice was between a president who said things aren't great, but i'm still going to try to make them better and a guy he painted as not having a plan and not identifying with the average wants and needs of middle class americans and in the end, people decided to stick with the devil they knew rather than the one they didn't. >> paul: so the election, the republican defeat was big, but it wasn't overwhelming in a sense of repudiation, kim, as far as a republican platform and their agenda? >> no, i think the reason, look, this country had the opportunity in this election to once again hand completely controlled government to democrats. everyone in the house was up for reelection and yet, they continued to give republicans, majority there. they liked divided government and i think you've got to look to the number of states that have elected very conservative governors who are doing the exact opposite of what barack obama is doing at the federal level. >> dan, there are some real impl
of revenue to the government according to a current law is. that is why the caller said we need to go over the cliff. i'm surprised that many callers were willing to go over the cliff. she mentioned that would be a chance for a recess, i think that is part of what is going on with people who believe they want to go from the republican standpoint, if you go over the cliff and the tax rates go back up, you instantly thought and the tax base. it also means more taxpayers are paying. instead of having 50% of taxpayers having no liability because their income is too low and because of deductions, you have a higher percentage that are pain and a broader base. you have more people to start sweating out more money from. once you do these spending cuts, then you decide from the standpoint of, we have already cut all this money, what do we absolutely need to add that in. in some ways, the reset would be shocking for members of congress to go through it. host: larry, you are on the line. caller: mine is a simple solution. we cannot keep going with the unlimited budget spending. my thought is one item
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